HMRC consults on accelerating tax payments by small businesses

HMRC has issued a call for evidence concerning suggestions of how to reduce the gap between when income or profit arises, and the related income tax or corporation tax is paid.

26th Mar 2021
Tax Writer
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While the consultation document explores a number of different ways in tax payments could be accelerated, it’s clear there are a number of issues to overcome to realise this change. The consultation is focussed on payments made under income tax self-assessment (ITSA) or corporation tax for small companies, which do not fall under the quarterly instalments regime.

The current situation

There can currently be a significant delay – of up to 22 months – between self-employed taxpayers starting to trade and when they pay their first tax bill. Even then, that tax payment covers the trader’s liability for their first tax year, in addition to a payment on account towards the second year’s liability.

While the situation isn’t quite so stark for established traders, payments on account are still generally made twice a year, with a balancing payment rounding out any outstanding liability.

For corporation tax, there is also delay between making the profits and when a small company pays the corporation tax due. All of the corporation tax due is payable in one amount, nine months and one day after the end of the company’s accounting period.

The issue

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Replies (49)

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By Paul Crowley
27th Mar 2021 13:44

Year end 31 March 2020 for a company has payday on 1 JAN 2021
Year end 31 March 2020 for person has 3 paydays Jan 20 on account 50% expected liability
July 20 50% expected liability and JAN 2021 trivial top up

Self assessment delivers 50% of tax even before the year has ended, then 50% in three months

What prat thought this up
Companies get a clear 9 months after the year end
Income tax then REALLY early
System already exists for big companies to pay early
Tag that system onto smaller companies up to £250,000 profit and all sorted out fairly

Do HMRC actually understand that payments on account are for the following year and paid in quickly, or is this just a stupid attempt to get a windfall catch up that can never be repeated

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By Paul Crowley
26th Mar 2021 11:58

'The issue
There are inherent problems with long time delays. Settling liabilities in large lump sums at set times of the year can cause issues, particularly if a tax bill is higher than expected.

Having more regular tax payments, based on in-year information, could give taxpayers greater certainty about their tax liability and help them better manage their tax affairs overall.

Given that approximately 34% of all outstanding debts to HMRC relate to ITSA and CT, it should also come as no surprise that there is an equal incentive for HMRC to accelerate tax payments.'

Complete rubbish
HMRC make no sensible attempt to collect tax from the recalcitrant
It they persued properly then bad debts would reduce

Paying more regularly would make zero difference

If CT is paid early HMRC show credit interest then STEAL it back by adding Permanent overpayment as an adjustment on the CT account for the year
Pointed this out to clients VERY regularly so they no longer bother to pay early.
If HMRC stopped stealing the interest more companies would pay early

They steal small sums owed to company but do not write off small sums owed to HMRC
I used to tell company clients to pay early as there was interest and I just do not bother any more
And HMRC no longer send out payslips with the right figure on it anymore
Perhaps HMRC needs to sort out the existing system first?

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By Paul Crowley
26th Mar 2021 13:23

Perhaps tax payers would engage if HMRC looked to refund overpaid tax in a timely manner.
Subcontractors pay tax above their tax liability each week
They wait the full year and HMRC regularly put blocks on refunds for months
Companies can wait effectively 12 months of trading and 6 months of HMRC tardiness

Tax should be on real figures that have been reconciled
Not casual software generated cobblers

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By 0098087
29th Mar 2021 10:33

Can't we wait until we are out of this sodding pandemic please. MTD in two years which is going to be a major disaster. And now changing the tax regime...where's the lottery numbers or the 8 score draws please

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By stephenleonard
29th Mar 2021 10:34

When I started in practice many years ago we had a thing called 'Advanced Corporation Tax' which was based on paying the CT equivalent to the profits needed to pay out dividends to shareholders (on the basis that if you had taken the Divis then you made the profit and therefore would owe the tax)

It wasn't perfect and in many cases it was a complete PITA but it meant there were far fewer CT liabilities outstanding and also far fewer Overdrawn Directors Loan accounts.

I am not saying we go back to that but in this digital age we live in I dont see it as a massive issue to start considering in year payments for companies - it will just mean that some need to be a little bit more up to date and accurate with the bookkeeping (which they should be anyway)

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By LAC47
29th Mar 2021 10:35

When MTD was first suggested many moons ago now, we always said that it was primarily designed so that the self employed taxpayers would be 'forced' into paying there tax bilss sonner than they do now.....no, no no said HMRC...who were they trying to kid!!!

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By NeilW
29th Mar 2021 10:43

Fairly obvious I would have thought. Put the self-employed on PAYE and get rid of the class 2, class 4 NI nonsense. All drawings are then paid via PAYE as salary.

Put all businesses on the same taxation footing.

Required taxation should be collected by reference to the wage bill, paid for largely by the employer not the employee. It's the point at which taxes bind the hardest and encourages businesses that use labour efficiently - which is where all productivity and therefore increases in standard of living comes from.

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Replying to NeilW:
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By Howard Walters
29th Mar 2021 10:57

Hmmm, taxed on drawings rather than profit? What lovely tax planning opportunities that would produce.

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Replying to NeilW:
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By johnjenkins
29th Mar 2021 11:28

So when a self-employed person has to put money in from whatever source, they get a refund? It never amazes me how many do not understand the workings of the self-employed.

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Replying to NeilW:
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By Springfield
29th Mar 2021 13:07

Notwithstanding the negative comments above - I'm with you on this. If a self-employed person can run a payroll for their employees, why (theoretically) shouldn't they put themselves on it too and become truly employed by self?

As for capital introduced? Just becomes a loan to the business?

Sometimes the simplest answers are the best.

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Replying to Springfield:
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By johnjenkins
29th Mar 2021 13:28

OMG where do these people come from. Let me explain the difference between an employed person and a self-employed person. An employed person has their work found for them, get paid every week or monthly, get holiday pay, get sick pay, get money paid towards their pension fund etc. etc. etc. Now a self-employed person has to get the work, get the work done, then get paid so that the people they employ can be paid. There are many other aspects of business, loans, purchase of equipment, collecting and paying tax on behalf of HMRC etc. etc. etc.
The main thing is that it has always been that the self-employed work out their tax and tax payments on a yearly basis. To change this system wouldn't work for a torrent of reasons and that is why it has never changed. If HMRC think they can combine MTD for the self-employed with RTI payments then they are a brick short of a load.
I really am sick and tired of people who haven't got a clue, knocking and trying to change the self-employed and that includes HMRC.

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By Springfield
29th Mar 2021 16:14

I am very well aware of the difference between an employee and a self-employed person. However, if I may respectfully point out, you are allowing the legal and commercial issues of a self employed person to be conflated with the collection of tax.

If the object of this exercise is to improve the collection of tax then allowing a person to employ themselves through their business payroll does exactly that.

Please tell me why a self employed person adding themselves (voluntarily perhaps) to their business payroll wouldn't improve the collection of tax?

Please tell me the difference between a self employed person who draws out all his surplus of say £2,000 per month and puts a percentage aside to pay his tax bill arising from his £24,000 annual profit, or a person who gets paid £2,000 per month gross, and has tax deducted at source.

Please tell me why I'm knocking the self employed?

Of course there would be details to resolve and I'm not saying I have all the answers but it's disappointing to see new ideas shot down in flames because "that's what we've always done".

As the original poster said, the NI issues need sorting, but that's something that needs doing at some point anyway if any future government has the stomach for it.

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Replying to Springfield:
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By johnjenkins
30th Mar 2021 09:58

I will take your example of tax paying for the self-employed on a monthly basis. There could come a point in the business where plant might be required. The business owner makes a decision to lower their income in order to pay for the equipment. Oh dear no money as tax man has got it, better borrow from the bank, oops interest to pay. Not a good commercial decision. So how do you tax a one man band Limited company? On the profits or the dividend, or as now both? HMRC are only trying to make MTD tie in with RTI to destroy the one man band business. The status of the self-employed. The reason why it has always been like this is because, commercially it works. To change the modus operandi of the one man band business just for the sake of getting tax earlier is commercial suicide. You only have to look at IR35 to see proof of that.
There is no reason why the current regime cannot continue with perhaps monthly payments, instead of every 6 months, with the ability (as you can now) to reduce those payments if necessary.
To try and force RTI on the self-employed will not work and anyone who thinks it will does not (IMV) have any understanding of how the self-employed industry, as diverse as it is, works.
We might as well give all our earnings to the government and let them give us pocket money as they see fit.

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Replying to Springfield:
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By Howard Walters
29th Mar 2021 13:52

Fait enough but how do you deal with the following anomaly:

£100k profit and take it all as drawing - pay tax etc. on £100k - job done.

£100k profit but take no drawings - pay zero tax etc. - whoops!

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blue sheep
By NH
29th Mar 2021 10:40

I have previously been shot down in flames by fellow AW members for my views on this but I state once again that it is totally ridiculous to have such a delay between when money is earned and when you pay your tax. That has to change and will change.

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Replying to NH:
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By practice for sale
29th Mar 2021 11:17

I agree.

Someone on payroll pays their tax for, say, May earnings immediately.

Self employed with a 30th April year end, they earn profits in May, and pay 1/2 their tax 20 months later, 1/2 26 months later. Completely illogical.

Company makes profits in month 1 of their year, and pays tax 20 months later.

I run my practice as a company, and years ago I set up a standing order to HMRC because I didn't like the big bill at the tax payment date, so I pay estimated tax in advance of the payment date, but still some time after the profits are earned.

Maybe they should look at the vat Annual Accounting scheme for ideas?

Also, all businesses should be taxed using the corporate model. I completely agree that self employed should be taxed on their drawings as they go along. This would avoid the very common scenario where 31st January comes along and the sole trade says "I wasnt expecting that much, I havent got it"!!

Oh and yes, **please** HMRC chase in the tax that is owed, first, then start messing up with new systems. If they put as much resource into collecting what was owed as they do in dreaming up new job justifying 'calls for evidence' they wouldnt have any cash flow problems.

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Replying to practice for sale:
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By Mallock
29th Mar 2021 13:01

How can the self employed pay tax on their drawings - that is nonsense!
What happens if a self employed individual makes profit of £100,000 and only draws out £40,000? Do they pay higher rate tax, do they keep Child Benefit, what rate of tax for the "excess" profits? It is completely unworkable.

If HMRC want paid more quickly I would happily accept a monthly payment based on an estimate of profit for the year. As I see it, that was the main aim of MTD so a monthly payment should remove the need for all the landlords and small businesses to get involved in MTD. Many of my more elderly landlord clients don't even have a computer and they certainly aren't capable of using compatible software.

We are being unnecessarily imposed upon by people who can't see the simple solutions.

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Replying to practice for sale:
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By Mallock
29th Mar 2021 17:03

Double post removed

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By gainsborough
29th Mar 2021 10:55

Just make it 4 quarterly payments based on previous tax year already and stop all this other nonsense.
Business owners have enough to deal with with Covid, Brexit and all the other red tape.

In year payments just don't work for the self-employed when you have annual adjustments, capital allowances and now the super-deduction. Completely different to employees so stop trying to treat them the same.

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By graydjames
29th Mar 2021 11:03

I already have a great difficulty in persuading clients that the Payment on Account system does NOT mean, as they always seem to think, that they are paying in advance. Paul Crowley states above:

"Self assessment delivers 50% of tax even before the year has ended, then 50% in three months"

but by 31 January they have earned at least 50% of their profit, usually much more (barring huge seasonal impacts), so still not remotely in advance. Is it unreasonable to pay some tax "even" before the year has ended?

For me the important change is not so much issue of the GAP between earning and paying tax (after all people in employment have to pay it as they go along - why should the self employed be any different) but it is more about being able to make payments regularly, and broadly in accordance with profits, and so avoid the problems caused by the payments on account system.

There's no doubt whatsoever, in my mind, that the payment on account system needs changing and I have believed this almost ever since it was introduced. The sometimes massive fluctuations in payments for a business that experiences significant variations in profits causes huge issues and I am fed up, despite every year giving advance warning about what might be the liability in the next January, for being blamed as the messenger! I should not have to feel guilty for giving bad news about tax liabilities, especially in cases where the client is tardy about providing their information. Therefore, if a new system avoids this, I see a lot of merit in it.

There would have to be measures to phase a change in, possibly over quite a long period of time to avoid serious cash flow issues, but otherwise, whilst I realise I won't be popular, I think change is needed.

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Replying to graydjames:
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By Paul Crowley
29th Mar 2021 11:20

Companies get 9 months after year end
Self employed pay 50% in the year and 50% 4 months after
Companies are legally required to keep better records than a self employed, who just needs to keep records sufficient to get the tax return correct
Both types have annual adjustments

Sort out companies first
They are the laggards in tax payments
They are also more likely to have adequate records
But even it is a stab in the dark

What tax reducing mechanism will exist for planned capital expenditure?
What punishment for then still not being able to buy the big new item until following year
Or even the cost up front of item not brought into use until following year

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By Nebs
29th Mar 2021 11:07

Luckily all the self employed religiously put money aside for their tax bills, so there will not be any problems in the transition year when they have to find 2 years tax payments in one year.

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By johnjenkins
29th Mar 2021 11:10

HMRC trying to sell MTD quarterly updates together with tax payment!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
As PC stated, who thought this rubbish up.
I'm pretty sure HMRC know our feelings on this subject. However it appears that the consultation is on how this can be achieved not if it can be achieved.
I really can't see it happening. If tax payers haven't got the money to pay every 6 months they won't have the money every quarter.

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By sammerchant
29th Mar 2021 11:47

I wonder if HMRC will also arrange to repay overpaid tax arising from losses carried back just as quickly. But I am not holding my breath.

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By memyself-eye
29th Mar 2021 12:16

I think HMRC are lovely.

2 days to go.

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By North East Accountant
29th Mar 2021 12:17

So as well as messing about with pointless quarterly updates HMRC will no doubt come up with a complex quarterly payment on account system.

Is HMRC's plan to make life so uncomfortable for the small self employed person that they just go into employment?

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Replying to North East Accountant:
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By johnjenkins
29th Mar 2021 12:33

Aha the penny has dropped. HMRC have been trying to destroy the one man band self-employed (in whatever guise) since Gordon Brown came to power. If the Government don't do something they will get a little shock at the next election, even though Labour don't have a lot to offer.

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By C J EYRE
29th Mar 2021 12:23

A client with a 30 April 2020 year end will end up with Tax based on that years profit plus any furloughed money they receive in the 2020/21 tax year. Not sure how that situation would have worked with the new system.

Lets leave the self-employed to spent their time earning money on which to pay taxes, rather than having to buy computer equipment. pay training fees or larger accountants bills and also maybe employing a book-keeper under the proposed MTD idea. Lets "Kill the Bill"

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By Michael C Feltham
29th Mar 2021 12:39

Well, as I forecast regarding MTD, it was clear then, HMRC and Government wanted all self-employed traders to be forced into what we might call PAYME- i.e. Pay As You Might Earn!

It was HMRC who changed the goalposts in 1997, remember, with the introduction of Self Assessment and the quantum shift to Current Year Basis. Excepting, of course, existing traders whose trading year straddled the desired April 6th to April 5th period whose Basis Period what a mix of Previous Year and Current Year.

In any case, as already pointed out, Payments On Account IS advanced payment! Thus the supposed large tax payment is only the balancing payment when a following year's revenue and net profit is significantly great than the preceding year.

For years, the idiot French demanded any small start-up business paid large amounts of tax in advance, just in case they might make a profit! Eventually, this was reformed; a bit late! And then they whined about the black economy! Which is still very much alive and well, thank you: I wonder why???

Sadly, we are saddled with utter idiots in Government ably assisted by even more ignorant fools in the senior levels of the Civil Service: the MTD fiasco is an excellent exemplar...

Jug Ears (Sunak) and the Buffoon trumpet how the UK economy will recover; personally, I wholly dispute this arrant nonsense.

As long as Government labours under the complete delusion that all UK taxpayers are a sort of Golden Goose laying endless supplies of golden eggs, then it will never change.

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By supremetwo
29th Mar 2021 14:02

Many self-employed, especially in the entertainments industry, have seasonal income or intermittent income.

So will HMRC be paying them for outlays for the rest of a tax year?

Or is the object to eliminate self-employment completely by forcing companies to employ a self-employed as an intermittent employee?

Edit: It will become easy to reduce the VAT threshold from its current £85, 000 to zero for everyone.

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By Arcadia
29th Mar 2021 14:25

It is perfectly feasible to tax the self employed as companies, so that their drawings are taxed on PAYE, and then the profit at the end of the year including all the adjustments for capital allowances etc is a true -up exercise. Owner's salary creates a loss? That is just the same as happens in a company. If the business can afford the drawings it can afford the tax. Directors with more than 5% shareholding also to pay tax on their drawings under PAYE as salary. That sorts out IR35. There is no justification whatsoever any longer for any kind of preferential treatment of PSCs. HMRC and the government hate them, and now the public have been made aware, and have no sympathy.

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Replying to Arcadia:
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By johnjenkins
30th Mar 2021 13:33

Let's just get rid of one man band business and see the result shall we?

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By Arcadia
29th Mar 2021 14:27

The vast majority of the self employed think their drawings are wages and tax allowable anyway. Why not just incorporate this into the system.

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By Steve Knowles
29th Mar 2021 14:35

The person who thought this up does not understand/ care about the small businesses that make up 90% of the economy. A new business starting out needs as much working capital as possible and stripping it out to pay taxes will simply stun its growth. Furthermore the problems that small business have getting paid is well known. There is also an assumption that profits flow evenly through the year, as if they were civil service salaries.

If they need the cash bring back certificates of cash deposit and advertise them.

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Replying to Steve Knowles:
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By Michael C Feltham
29th Mar 2021 14:55

@ Steve Knowles:

"The person who thought this up does not understand/ care about the small businesses that make up 90% of the economy. "

Actually, Steve SMEs comprise circa 48-49% of UK Private Sector GDP: and create around 48% of private sector employment.

The vast majority of SMEs are what are termed Class Size Zero; i.e. one worker, the proprietor.

See here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/business-population-estimates-2...

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By stephenleonard
29th Mar 2021 14:40

Some interesting and varied viewpoints on this which highlight the different ways in which people/business can be taxed and also the problems/benefits each create.

The aim of the consultation is to gather these views and then come to some future process - will everyone on here with their valid and varying opinions be giving them as part of the consultation or will the majority just sit on their keyboards moaning and arguing amongst ourselves.

Personally I will give my views on the pros and cons of the current and any proposed systems. Do I think as a lone voice I can change anything - no - but if everyone got involved it may actually help but it certainly cant hurt!

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Replying to stephenleonard:
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By johnjenkins
30th Mar 2021 13:24

No one can change anything, Stephen, that's why many don't bother voicing their views. Taking account of the experience and many years in the Accountancy profession of our posters who constantly disagree with HMRC trying to put the one man band business on PAYE of some sort, yet whose voices fall upon deaf ground, is it little wonder not many will offer their views to the consultation (that in itself is a laugh, HMRC have already made their mind up).

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Replying to johnjenkins:
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By stephenleonard
30th Mar 2021 14:34

John that may sadly be true - but Id rather try and fail than just sit and moan that no one listens (when in most cases no on actually talks to the people who are asking)

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Replying to stephenleonard:
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By johnjenkins
30th Mar 2021 14:52

We don't sit and moan, Stephen. We go as far as we can on this forum, then wait while HMRC make a hash of it. Reverse charge VAT was only supposed to catch the labour only subbies who were on flat rate, now look at it and what a mess it will be and we are only a month in. HMRC listen then if it doesn't fall into what they want, they disregard it. HMRC, unfortunately are unfit for purpose just like the EU (sorry I digress, but the similarities on trying to achieve an ideal which won't work is stark).
The answer is very simple. Let agents take over the administration (including employment status) and let HMRC do what they should and that is investigate and collect.

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By timothyvogel
29th Mar 2021 16:09

The issue as I see it is I have no problem with paying tax soon as the profit is earned. that is what happens with the employed and with VAT and morally it seems right. the problem I have is there is a fundamental difference between when income is received and profit earned. IT works both ways so take a Forensic accounting report I did 3 years ago. I invoiced 3 years ago, but am getting paid next week. I know this when I invoiced, there is no risk as that is the practice in the industry, payment when the case goes to court or settles. I factor in the time delay into the bill. Turnover reported 3 years ago, profit earned then, get the money now but under the probable new system, I paid tax well in advance of getting the money. Likewise, a case where I do a massive bit of work and the client s risky so I insist on payment upfront, but it takes 18 months to complete the work, covering 3 accounting periods. do I pay the tax in the first one because that is where the income is, but much of the costs in period 2 or even period 3? That is the problem. Yes, the current system is not good but it benefits the risk-takers in small business, paying quarterly based on projections means making extra work for the taxpayer to benefit HMRC (just like VAT and NIC and PAYE and CIS) and penalizing those who want to help clients with non-regular cash flow.
The old adage if ain't broke don't fix it springs to mind. In this case what exactly is broke? - the fact that HMRC are useless at collecting money, or that people do not report it?

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Replying to timothyvogel:
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By johnjenkins
30th Mar 2021 13:18

"what exactly is broke"? HMRC.

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By ds
29th Mar 2021 22:51

Maybe I'm missing the point here, but surely the total tax take over any twelve month period will be the same. Having four, twelve or fifty-two tax periods and respective payments within the next month, will reap the same amount of cash but increase the administration many times.

Does the Treasury think profits are made as easily as they can print money from the magical tree in the basement? What about seasonal work? Some industries may make their money in six months of the year and tick over for the rest. How will they then fund these fallow months?

I think the Wunderkind Chancellor is something of a lightweight once again promoted above his ability. It is one thing to be working in an investment bank and another thing completely controlling the country's complicated finances.

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By norstar
30th Mar 2021 11:55

What HMRC don't understand is that before they collect more tax in advance, they need to earn our trust.

My current experience is of HMRC hiding overpayments, withholding/writing off repayment supplment and generally performing - in my opinion - dishonestly about money owed back to taxpayers, so this system will mean that not only do they collect more tax up front, but they'll also then sit on more overpayments and not tell clients.

I am absolutely disgusted to see them send out statements requesting a tax payment on account, when logging in online reveals that the client has overpaid tax by £5k. Opening balance on statement? £0.00.

Loss claims are taking up to a year to get processed.

Refunds requested get held up in "security checks" for weeks.

If I did this with my client account I'd be disciplined by the ACCA.

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By sammerchant
30th Mar 2021 13:34

The overriding impression is that HMRC wish to transfer as much of their own work over to the agents and taxpayers, thereby making their lives so much easier.

Moreover, HMRC's insistence on receiving certain information by Making Tax Digital tells me that they haven't the faintest idea of what constitutes a set of annual (even quarterly or management) accounts. There is little point in having details of all bank transactions if the crucial elements of the set of accounts - the stock/work-in-progress, payments in advance, sales (including unpaid ones), unpaid purchases etc and those items that affect the annual 'cut-off' exercise marrying purchases with stock and sales - are not dealt with. Moreover, there will be adjustments for writing-down capital allowances, even if the 100% annual ones are picked up in the transactions.

This is a pointless exercise and smacks purely of 'Big Brother'. We accountants should refuse to have anything to do with it. But do we have the guts to say 'NO'?

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By johnjenkins
30th Mar 2021 13:50

Personally most of us would say NO, however our bodies would cave in and say "how high would you like us to jump".

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By sammerchant
31st Mar 2021 17:11

I know of several accountants who are serious about quitting. MTD for VAT is bad enough, but imagine that applied to all earning over £10,000 (or with Property Income over the same figure) in SA. Nightmare!

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By norstar
01st Apr 2021 17:27

Here's a serious point - we contacted HMRC today about a tax return amendment from October that hadn't been processed. They apologised and said like most of these, it hadn't been allocated to someone yet. We're having a nightmare getting loss claims, repayments etc dealt with.

If they can't organise the proverbial p-up in a brewery with one tax return submission a year, how do they propose to do it with four?

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By C J EYRE
01st Apr 2021 18:43

I had to try and contact the Revenue 4 times during the lockdown in respect of 4 clients Tax Returns that I had submitted online, and they had acknowledged receipt of them, but they had not processed them for some reason. Three clients were due refunds of approx. £1500, £800 and £400 . Took nearly 3 months for them to sort out, but no interest paid.

I got so fed up with no response to phone calls or letter that I raised an official complaint weigh the MP in charge of the Revenue. His office responded in less that 90 minutes and he responded within 3 days. Nice to know that somebody listens to our complaints.

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By C J EYRE
01st Apr 2021 18:43

I had to try and contact the Revenue 4 times during the lockdown in respect of 4 clients Tax Returns that I had submitted online, and they had acknowledged receipt of them, but they had not processed them for some reason. Three clients were due refunds of approx. £1500, £800 and £400 . Took nearly 3 months for them to sort out, but no interest paid.

I got so fed up with no response to phone calls or letter that I raised an official complaint weigh the MP in charge of the Revenue. His office responded in less that 90 minutes and he responded within 3 days. Nice to know that somebody listens to our complaints.

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