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MTD ITSA delay gives industry 12 months extra to plan
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Software suppliers tweak plans for MTD ITSA in 2024

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Hard-pressed accountants aren’t the only group to breathe a sigh of relief about the delay to Making Tax Digital last week. John Stokdyk gets the inside view from the country’s tax software suppliers.

29th Sep 2021
Editor in Chief AccountingWEB
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Like accountants across the UK, accounting and tax software developers are reviewing their calendars and reprioritising plans for the transition to MTD for income tax (MTD ITSA) after the first secretary to the Treasury Lucy Frazer announced a 12-month delay to the timetable last week.

While the announcement came with little warning, there was a growing consensus that the odds were shifting in favour of a delay. “The basis period reform proposal was such a fundamental change that to change something so big seemed like a risk with such a short timetable. Given pushback from accountants, professional bodies and us, it seemed inevitable it would be delayed,” said Jenny Strudwick, head of tax at IRIS Software Group.

TaxCalc director of product compliance Dean Shepherd struck a similar note in a LinkedIn post: “This announcement will no doubt be a relief to many who felt HMRC were not in a position to roll out MTD for ITSA successfully in April 2023.” 

The MTD effect on software development

Accountants have devoted so much time and energy to preparing for and adjusting to the ever-changing MTD timetable that many may have overlooked the impact HMRC’s digital transformation has had on the accounting software industry.

Thousands of programmer years that could have been spent on enhancing product functionality have been poured into coding new online compliance rules and tracking the moving target of HMRC’s MTD technical guidance.

As MTD drags on through the decade, HMRC’s grand project will continue to stunt the profession and its software suppliers in other areas. As one industry insider commented, “If we hadn’t had to gear up for the original plan to go live in 2018, we would have been able to do so much more.”

Unanswered questions

But compliance changes continue to pay the rent for both accountants and the software industry. The big headaches come, however, when HMRC doesn’t give them clear and timely guidance - another characteristic that has become increasingly common during the MTD era.

While welcoming the delay on behalf of customers, “many of whom disagree with the speed of changes”, BTCSoftware director Rob Ellis flagged gaps in HMRC’s technical guidance on MTD ITSA. 

“As software developers, this delay provides an opportunity to work with HMRC to gain further clarity into some grey areas identified by many accountants, such as the process for businesses and landlords with multiple income sources,” he told AccountingWEB.

Sage’s product marketing director for accountancy and tax Chris Downing weighed in on remaining unknowns around landlords: “Many accountants have clients with shared property ownership. How should multiple bookkeeping solutions be reflected in a single quarterly update? We’d like to see clarification on what HMRC expects from this journey, and how to differentiate earnings from furnished holiday lets from buy-to-lets.

“There are also nuances in the final declaration - effectively a new self assessment return - we really want to understand the detail.”

TaxCalc’s Dean Shepherd and IRIS head of tax Jenny Strudwick were also waiting for more detail on partnerships. Last week’s draft legislation confirmed that trading and property partnerships would be given an extra year until April 2025 before they join MTD ITSA, but the date when other types of partnerships will have to join was not confirmed, Shepherd noted. 

“Partnerships will be mandated from April 2025 and the only way that works is if you have a pilot phase. We’re making the assumption that something has to be there before April 2024 and we’ll be ready to take part in the pilot,” said Strudwick.

As tax software producers the message from IRIS and other developers was that they can only plan their work when they know HMRC’s plans.

“We need a bigger picture view,” said IRIS head of accountancy Steve Cox. “Then we can see how to use one bit of code elsewhere in the program for a similar function. We need the big picture to manage how we’re going to build it.”

Questionable costings

The other source of potential friction spotted by sharp-eyed AccountingWEB members last week were unrealistic impact assessment costings that leaned heavily on the availability of free software to make the quarterly MTD submissions. 

BTCSoftware’s Rob Ellis responded: “The requirements of MTD ITSA development are complex and likely to prohibit the development of free software. However, we continue to work behind the scenes to create a solution that will provide an affordable, comprehensive and intuitive means to manage MTD for ITSA.”

Sage’s Chris Downing gave a rueful laugh as he considered the comments from AccountingWEB members on the HMRC costings. “I haven't seen how they were computed from the business owner’s perspective of applying the tech,” he said. “They do seem particularly low considering the role agents will play in submitting the update.”

Downing emphasised that Sage seeks to support HMRC in all its propositions, but added that the company was still waiting to find out what the tax department deemed to be simplest businesses that would be worthy of free software.

“It’s a difficult situation,” he said. “A small business may still require sophisticated software - a trader earning £15,000 on Amazon may need a sophisticated tool to capture transactions accurately. The nature and activity of individual businesses will dictate the sophistication of their software need.”

Opportunity to plan properly

The overall response from developers was almost universal - the delay would not affect any of their plans to support customers through the pilot programme and support accounting firms to get ready for MTD ITSA by 2024. With so much change to deliver in the next few years, accountants and developers will now have confidence they can control and plan properly for MTD ITSA.

“My biggest concern for the profession is that people will just sit back and wait,” said Steve Cox. “We need to learn from what happened last time [MTD for VAT implementation in 2019]. People didn’t get clients ready in time. They didn’t explain it to clients and HMRC didn’t put enough information into the marketplace to tell people what MTD was about.

“If we take a holiday, people won’t learn. That’s why we’re not changing our plans.

We’ll continue so they’re ready and they can make their clients ready. Let’s not waste the 12 months we've been given by HMRC.”

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Still confused about MTD? Register for one of our popular MTD Bootcamps at AccountingWEB Live Expo with Rebecca Benneyworth or attend one of our HMRC sessions. There are over 60 panels, workshops, seminars and lectures at AccountingWEB Live Expo this December, covering self assessment, the Autumn Budget and much more - many with CPD attached.

AccountingWEB Live Expo takes place on 1-2 December 2021 at Coventry Building Society Arena, Coventry. Registration is now open. A full content programme will be announced in early October enabling you to register for specific sessions. 

Register now

Replies (42)

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By Hugo Fair
29th Sep 2021 15:51

Well, who'd have thought it ... me agreeing with an IRIS spokesperson - “We need a bigger picture view,” said IRIS head of accountancy Steve Cox!

The biggest single problem facing developers (and thence any communication to agents or end users) is the way that HMRC have latched on to the word 'agile' as a golden bullet - which it is NOT!
It can be a useful technique for rapid prototyping of vague possibilities, but is never an adequate foundation for major new architectures that are entirely missing a coherent 'bigger picture' (aka set of user requirements, development specifications and test/maintenance harnesses).

To rely on 'agile', like a mantra, in the face of an inability to define the most basic parameters (as raised time and again elsewhere on this site) is somewhere between misguided and pathetic.

An analogy would be to ask engineers to design space modules (say for recycling waste, for growing plants, for performing chemical tests, etc) ... without bothering to mention, or even decide, whether these modules are to be part of a static space=station, a space shuttle regularly flying to & from the moon, or a long-distance (potentially one-way) trip to Saturn. The overall picture really does matter - and can't simply be retro-fitted in the light of feedback, political or otherwise.

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Replying to Hugo Fair:
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By Rgab1947
30th Sep 2021 09:47

Do they even know what agile means in the IT world? Doubt it.

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Replying to Hugo Fair:
John Stokdyk, AccountingWEB head of insight
By John Stokdyk
30th Sep 2021 13:02

I agree wholeheartedly, Hugo - agile development is not compatible with work on a stupidly complex system that is defined and driven by legislation.

The debacle of Gov.uk's bungled attempts to publish user-friendly guidance should have taught them that.

Long before George Osborne announced the death of the tax return in 2015 and gave HMRC a £1.8bn budget to make tax digial, somebody should have sat down with the OTS and other interested parties (like accountants) to see how tax legislation could have been simplified BEFORE trying to automate it.

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Replying to John Stokdyk:
Tornado
By Tornado
30th Sep 2021 14:13

MTD It was the idea of David Gauke and this article is a reminder of what was promised ... especially NO quarterly returns.

https://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/comment/article-3414649/DAVID-GAUKE-...

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Replying to Tornado:
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By AdamMurphy
30th Sep 2021 16:02

Within that article: "I would never support a reform I thought would add extra burdens on the businesses that have driven the economic recovery. Instead, this is about making life easier for them – and saving them time and money"

Perhaps somebody could kindly point me towards which aspect of MTD meets this?!

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Replying to AdamMurphy:
Morph
By kevinringer
30th Sep 2021 16:28

@Adam, I feel the answer lies in HMRC's genuine believe MTD will save businesses money. And HMRC have come to that conclusion because HMRC think most businesses are digital whizzes and have digitised everything and all they need to is 'press the button' to file everything. Simples. HMRC think this because HMRC use IT all the time so they think Joe the Plumber does too. When Self Assessment was introduced, HMRC still had local offices which meant HMRC staff still had contact with their 'customers'. So HMRC had some idea what their 'customers' abilities were. Fast forward to 2021 and all those local offices have closed, HMRC has almost no contact with its 'customers', so HMRC have no idea what their customer's capabilities are. Over the last 25 years HMRC have got rid of their old paper files and have digital records only (though as we all know, a lot of their processes are still manual). And because HMRC have no idea what is going on in the outside world, HMRC think Joe the Plumber has got rid of his paper records too and gone digital. HMRC's loss of 'customer' contact has resulted in all these unworkable HMRC regimes such as 30-day CGT.

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Replying to kevinringer:
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By AdamMurphy
30th Sep 2021 17:14

Don't start me on 30 day CGT, just had to help a technophobe client with that!

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Replying to AdamMurphy:
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By Geoff56
01st Oct 2021 08:40

Because of the feedback on AWeb and the type of client I have, I didn't attempt the online route and have just used paper CGT returns, which seem fairly easy to get hold of now.

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Replying to Geoff56:
Morph
By kevinringer
01st Oct 2021 11:12

Mine have all been paper too. The only problem with the paper route has been not knowing when the CGT bill will arrive and then only having 7 days to pay (problem if it arrives when the client is away). That's less of a problem now that HMRC have increased this to 30 days.

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Replying to Tornado:
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By Paul Crowley
30th Sep 2021 18:12

Even better
Saving £400 Million in accountancy fees

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Tornado
By Tornado
29th Sep 2021 18:36

Yes what a waste of time, resources and money this MTD fiasco has been.

We already have a system in self assessment that more than adequately deals with most aspects of tax declarations and has had twenty years plus to iron out most of the problems. MTD is trying to re-invent this wheel but this time the problems just get worse with no creditable likelihood that they will ever be resolved.

It is a pity that the Government did not spend thousands of millions of pounds on fine tuning Self Assessment instead of wasting it on a failed project like MTD. This would have given us the opportunity to encourage clients to adopt a more digital approach to record keeping over a period of time and at the pace that we and out clients can easily cope with, whilst maintaining and improving an already excellent system of tax administration.

I don't see that MTD has any chance of success unless the Government completely back off and properly review the situation.

Yes what a waste of time, resources and money this MTD fiasco has been

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By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
30th Sep 2021 10:16

now HMRC have officially decoupled the quarterly nonsense from the real business of the year end tax return, can there not now be considerably backpaddling on all the finer details of the quarterly updates?

Surely in situations for example on landlords where there is split ownership of the properties (a property might have 3 or more owners all with different shares), if that data is going to be completely unused by anyone for the computation of taxes, it no longer need to be accurate. It just needs to be "something filed" for the box to be ticked. I certainly wont be losing any sleep over what numbers are filed, assuming this thing actually gets launched before its cancelled, as the numbers are not being used for anything at all.

Its the complexity which buries MTD, which is why practioners have been shaking their heads on this for years as we 'get it' as its what we do. It seems to be very very slowly dawning on HMRC and also the software people how much accountants actually do in turning a random collection of data into data with which taxes can be accurately computed in a wide range of mind boggling situations.

Its perhaps also a reminder of why the humble spreadsheet is so useful as its infinitely flexible to match the infinite variations of client's situations.

my prediction is we end up like iXBRL for company accounts, a big tech project trumpeted as the future with all this data available, which is completely unused by HMRC and unchecked and no-one on the ground gives a stuff about.

In this case quarterly filing will just be a weird obligation, probably for VAT registered businesses only, and effectively optional for everyone else. The new year end return will however go ahead at huge cost for no benefits over the existing digital tax return system.

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Replying to ireallyshouldknowthisbut:
Tornado
By Tornado
30th Sep 2021 11:39

"my prediction is we end up like iXBRL for company accounts, a big tech project trumpeted as the future with all this data available, which is completely unused by HMRC and unchecked and no-one on the ground gives a stuff about. "

If I remember correctly the plan was for 30,000 pieces of information to be tagged in iXBRL Accounts. Then there was the Real Time Information dream where employers would advise HMRC through the RTI system of employees gross pay and employer NIC for each pay period and also pay HMRC this amount. HMRC would work out the tax liability of that individual based on similar reports and payments from other employers, pension schemes, state benefits, etc, in the same pay period and then HMRC would make one payment to that individual deducting tax ,etc.

These are all great ideas but are well and truly in the realms of fantasy. HMRC have a real problem in distinguishing fantasy from reality and we always end up having to pay for it one way or another. I think the software developers are fed up with this as well, as every five minutes they have to deal with another fantasy idea from HMRC that takes a lot of hours to deal with.

The fact is that mind boggling amounts of our money has been spent on MTD and what have got to show for it ........... nothing.

I think a Freedom of Information Application is one way to find out where the money has gone or even a Government Enquiry.

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By djtax
30th Sep 2021 10:49

One quote in the article says 'HMRC didn’t put enough information into the marketplace to tell people what MTD was about' (in reference to the introduction of MTD for VAT).

With the introduction of the new 30 day CGT system HMRC went one better - as far as I am aware they made no effort whatsoever to let anyone know what was coming (hence the widespread lack of awareness amongst estate agents and solicitors let alone taxpayers - as an accountant I only heard about it from CPD training sessions not from HMRC).

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Replying to djtax:
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By HLB
30th Sep 2021 11:33

Bring back Hector the Inspector I say. He did a fine job on the introduction of self assessment. Oh, wait a minute - they will have to be sure it works first before communicating with the general public otherwise they will be seen by everyone to be as clueless as they appear to be to us in the profession. Politicians can't be having that. When is the next election? My guess it will all be put off until after that.

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David Ross
By davidross
30th Sep 2021 11:02

Surely a trader turning over £15000 with Amazon will record the money they get into the Bank as turnover? i.e. a Bank Feed

There are many complexities and the software developers have my full sympathy, but let's not overcook this

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Replying to davidross:
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By BeardyWeardy
30th Sep 2021 11:47

That might just about work on the cash basis, but if you want to get the full details and do it on invoice accounting you do need to capture the data from Amazon directly.

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Replying to davidross:
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By Hugo Fair
30th Sep 2021 12:21

I don't have that type of client, but am prepared (on the basis of logic) to accept that MTD (when reduced to that minimalist state for quarterly returns) will 'work' for them ... although that's not the same as saying they'll feel any benefits from doing so.
However, I could design a system that was perfect for some other sub-sector (say fresh fruit'n'veg stalls) - without claiming it must be used by everyone else!

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By johnhemming
30th Sep 2021 11:50

According to HMRC's web page there are three software providers that have an option which qualifies for HMRC's description as free software

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/find-software-thats-compatible-with-making-t...

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Replying to johnhemming:
Tornado
By Tornado
30th Sep 2021 12:30

johnhemming wrote:

According to HMRC's web page there are three software providers that have an option which qualifies for HMRC's description as free software

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/find-software-thats-compatible-with-making-t...

Do these include free comprehensive training and ongoing support?

Perhaps HMRC will provide this.

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Replying to Tornado:
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By johnhemming
30th Sep 2021 14:02

Tornado wrote:

Do these include free comprehensive training and ongoing support?

Perhaps HMRC will provide this.


The idea is that there will be support provided. It may, however, only be via email.

You can then ask whether providing training videos is sufficient or not.

The challenge for the freemium business model is ensuring that the costs of running the free services are sufficiently low so that the profit from the premium service covers all costs.

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Replying to johnhemming:
Tornado
By Tornado
30th Sep 2021 14:19

"The challenge for the freemium business model is ensuring that the costs of running the free services are sufficiently low so that the profit from the premium service covers all costs."

That is not our problem. All I was asking is if free training and support comes with free software. A very simple and straightforward question.

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Replying to johnhemming:
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By Hugo Fair
30th Sep 2021 12:30

So it says (although not exactly shouted) on that GOV.UK page ... but if you go the individual supplier sites to check on pricing:
* one makes no mention of any free version;
* one has a 'free for first 12 months' offer (which then becomes £5.99/mth);
* one is at least honest (step forward John) about the difficulties in creating a truly free pricing model - and so is still reviewing all the aspects.

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Replying to Hugo Fair:
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By johnhemming
30th Sep 2021 13:28

It remains, however, that some MTD ITSA returns are submitted using free software.

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Replying to johnhemming:
Tornado
By Tornado
30th Sep 2021 13:48

johnhemming wrote:

It remains, however, that some MTD ITSA returns are submitted using free software.

That may be statement of fact but it does not make Free Software viable. It is a bit like saying that you were given a free printer with your new computer but it will not actually work until you have purchased £200 of ink or toner cartridges and signed up to a mandatory service agreement.

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Replying to Tornado:
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By johnhemming
30th Sep 2021 14:04

That's true, but I can say submissions are made by some people without paying for anything.

Now you then have the question as to whether the more expensive software is sufficiently better. The point about software, however, is that the marginal cost of it is essentially zero. As long as the support costs are handleable then it can be quite straightforward to make it work commercially.

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Replying to johnhemming:
By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
30th Sep 2021 14:24

We were promised free software for the much much simpler process of sending 8 boxes of VAT to HMRC, before this was quickly dropped and to my knowledge no-one is working for free for HMRC on filing VAT returns. It typically costs at least £10 a filing, often more for bridging products.

It wont happen. Its an empty promise from government that they expect the private sector to magically fill.

Anyone who be thinks there will be free software available for any decent level of functionality is I am afraid very naïve. Business don't give away their core product for free unless there is the opportunity for considerable upsell. This is an unwanted product by the consumer, you are not going to pay for a "nicer one" if the free one does the job, you just use the free one. Hence no-one is going to give it away for free, or if they do, will quickly go out of business. Any sort of advertising model wont work as you will only use the thing for a few seconds porting some shoddy data to HMRC's servers, to then be ignored.

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Morph
By kevinringer
30th Sep 2021 13:12

A good example of the failure of 'agile' technology is the SA API. HMRC didn't upgrade it to report on SEISS until well into 2021 filing season. And when HMRC did upgrade it (to version 1.2) it was over-reporting by a factor of 100! I would expect 'agile technology' to fix that mistake within 24 hours, but no, it took weeks. But even then, some major software suppliers couldn't get it to work properly (eg CCH putting the figure in the SEISS overclaimed box) or not work at all (eg Iris, PTP). And that is just one API. MTD ITSA has dozens of them.

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Morph
By kevinringer
30th Sep 2021 13:28

As predicted by us practitioners, MTD ITSA is a far bigger challenge than MTD VAT. This was obvious because VAT is a transactional tax which can be reported monthly, quarterly or annually. But IT is an annual tax and any attempt to make it quarterly means you have to convert Self Assessment into a sort of PAYE system. It ain't going to work.

HMRC had its ears tickled by the software industry but now the software industry is realising just how big a task MTD ITSA is compared to MTD VAT. And who is going to pay for it? Maybe the software industry was banking on loads of compulsory customers? But I reckon some suppliers will end up having to increase their prices. All HMRC's costings appear to look at existing software prices and don't consider the increases that will have to be imposed to support the massive add-on that is MTD ITSA.

But we need to take a step back and remind ourselves why HMRC wanted MTD. HMRC argued that (1) MTD will be cheaper for 'customers' than their existing record keeping and (2) it was required to close the tax gap. We practitioners argued HMRC were wrong, but HMRC ignored us. Then HMRC started to admit the 'customer' savings weren't as great as HMRC said, then there wasn't a saving, and now HMRC admits there is a cost. Then last week we learn that the tax gap has increased as a result of MTD VAT. Given that MTD ITSA will increase costs further and likely increase the tax gap, why are HMRC pushing ahead? Is it to save face? Is it that once the HMRC steam roller has started no one can stop it?

At least my MTD client roll-out has been the right policy: do nothing until it is mandated. It's not that I'm against IT, far from it. But I only put clients on software if there's a good commercial reason. My policy has saved me a lot of grief so far and will continue to save grief until 2025 (almost all my clients are partnerships).

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Replying to kevinringer:
Chris M
By mr. mischief
30th Sep 2021 13:35

That has been my policy too, supplemented by MTU if the dreaded date of mandation arrives.

Making Tax Up.

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Replying to kevinringer:
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By johnhemming
30th Sep 2021 13:36

I still think it is worth a tax agent entering one taxpayer into the pilot scheme if possible. The problem to date has been that very few taxpayers have qualified for the pilot scheme.

It is, however, very much the case that MTD ITSA has a lot more subtleties than MTD VAT.

I haven't seen anything that proves that MTD VAT has increased the tax gap.

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Replying to johnhemming:
Morph
By kevinringer
30th Sep 2021 13:57

johnhemming wrote:

I haven't seen anything that proves that MTD VAT has increased the tax gap.


https://www.accountingweb.co.uk/tax/personal-tax/mtd-fails-to-reduce-the... "The gap between amount of VAT paid and VAT expected to be paid has increased by £2.3bn during the first year of MTD for VAT, undermining a key justification for the MTD programme."
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Replying to kevinringer:
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By johnhemming
30th Sep 2021 14:22

Thanks for giving the link. As far as I can see their methodology is to estimate how much VAT should have gone up and compare that to the amount that it actually increased.

That does not indicate any causality. (or even that the figures given the changes as a result of Brexit are actually making good assumptions).

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Replying to johnhemming:
By ireallyshouldknowthisbut
30th Sep 2021 15:37

@John, whilst you may state there is no causality, its how HMRC measure it.

if the gap has gone down HMRC would be trumpeting the success of the system. All logic suggests software will overclaim on expenses and underclaim on income, whilst manual accounts will tend to miss expenses and thus underclaim on VAT. Accountants know this as we do this stuff for a living, day in, day out. We know if you tend to be "taking out" or "putting in" when correcting client paperwork. So if more VAT is being done on software, more less VAT will be paid over. Its fairly simple logic.

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Replying to kevinringer:
ghm
By TaxTeddy
30th Sep 2021 15:39

+1

Client needs are paramount. HMRC requirements a poor second.

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Morph
By kevinringer
30th Sep 2021 13:33

Why has the software industry only just realised it won't be ready for 2023? The main software that my clients use is Sage desktop and QuickBooks Online. Both will only close the books to the end of a month. Yet both would need to close the books at 5 April for certain sources of income, even if the accounting year has a different date. Given the software industry knew this way back when MTD was announced in the last decade, why haven't they done anything about it? Are they only just realising that a sole trader with a rental property will probably have just the one bank account yet the income will have to be reported to different periods. Maybe it isn't just HMRC that are out of touch with their 'customers'. Maybe the software industry is too?

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Replying to kevinringer:
Tornado
By Tornado
30th Sep 2021 14:00

I have some sympathy with the software developers in that dealing with HMRC is probably like dealing with an unruly child that does not know what it really wants, keeps changing its mind every few minutes and very much lives in a fantasy world of Unicorns, Mermaids and Harry Potter's magic.

Judging by the way that I never get a reply to my letters, I am beginning to wonder if they have even learned to read and write yet.

MTD ... there is not a snowballs chance in hell that they will be able to deal with this.

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Replying to kevinringer:
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By GHarr497688
30th Sep 2021 14:35

The software companies couldn't care less as long as they get the £30 a month and keep putting the price up once they have got you. Software companies don't listen to the Accountants or the Customers. All they seem to do is patronise everyone and not answer the phone when the pressure mounts.

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By North East Accountant
30th Sep 2021 13:55

It must be galling for the software companies to spend millions on getting ready for MTD only for HMRC to move the goalposts every 5 minutes.

And it's not good for us because that money could have been better spent developing products and we'll end up paying through increased subscriptions too.

HMRC really do need to come clean with their ultimate aim for MTD, because everyone but HMRC, can see that the quarterly updates are a complete waste of time..... and so will get the kind of attention that a complete waste of time gets....as little as possible.

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By GHarr497688
30th Sep 2021 14:29

Now: get the books in quickly in June , prepare accounts enter the other bits and pieces and file by July - easy.

New system: Sign clients up for expensive software they can can't use and don't understand or charge them an arm and leg to do to for them. Although even this might not be achievable for a multitude of reasons within the scope of a business. Chase the clients six times a year who will become overwhelmed with the new system. Receive the records eventually and file garbage to HMRC that means nothing.
Scrap the original filings and put everything right for the year end.

WHAT PLONKER THOUGHT THIS UP !!

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Replying to GHarr497688:
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By djtax
01st Oct 2021 12:15

J Harra?

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Replying to GHarr497688:
Tornado
By Tornado
01st Oct 2021 12:31

"WHAT PLONKER THOUGHT THIS UP !!"

Obviously someone who knows nothing about the tax system!

Watch out for changes at the top as those responsible jump ship before the situation gets really desperate.

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