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MTD software: What does free mean?

24th Nov 2016
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The tax and accounting software industry is showing some reluctance to buy into HMRC’s vision for free software to help the smallest businesses comply with quarterly reporting under the proposed Making Tax Digital regime. Richard Hattersley and John Stokdyk report.

In AccountingWEB’s recent Practice Excellence Live MTD webinar HMRC’s Clare Sheehan referred to the free software initiative and commented: “We’ve been having some really positive discussions with software developers about that.”

But Xero’s Gary Turner poured cold water on the idea at the New Zealand developer’s roadshow in Bristol last Tuesday. “We don’t think you can give a great experience without charging for it,” he said.

Turner explained that Xero’s philosophy is “not to do it for free” and added: “Our lowest price plan has to be worth something.”

Since former Chancellor George Osborne and HMRC committed the industry to coming up with free tools earlier this year, the idea met resistance and is currently bogged down in discussions with the software trade body BASDA over what exactly HMRC means by free.

Also in AccountingWEB’s live broadcast, Mark Purdue from Thomson Reuters explained that in its MTD consultations, the government effectively said: “We are looking to software developers to provide free software. Discuss.”

Both sides agree that if someone is charging others to file returns on their behalf, they should be prepared to pay for professional software and spread the cost across their own client base.

Purdue said that if you are an unrepresented, small business, HMRC wants there to be free apps available for you to record expenses and send them into the tax department. “They don’t view agents as falling into that group,” he added.

Rob Ellis, director of BTCSoftware, told AccountingWEB: “We have already told HMRC that we will not be providing free software. They were fine with that, but only because we do not sell to individuals, just agents.”

On behalf of Sage, accountant cloud apps product director Fabiola Stein said the company was was closely monitoring developments in this area.

“As always, we are committed to supporting the 5m small businesses across the UK and we will support them through the transition,” she said.

It has already developed Sage Expenses, which is available free of charge to small business users. Stein said “the iPhone expenses app would likely form part of Sage's MTD strategy alongside some of our other apps for business”.

“Sage Expenses is not our answer to MTD, but it addresses three key pain points for businesses with accounting software: complexity, time and expense. It is a change they can make today and start getting ready for the digital transformation. We want to make it super easy now so it is not a painful change,” she said.

“The challenge we face is the same one every developer has - we still don’t have details on what’s required.”

Clearbooks director Tim Fouracre  said the company was working on a package tailored for accountants with lots of clients on Excel or desktop software, “but it won't be free”.

He continued: “We're creating an MTD package that will let accountants bring on their clients in bulk for those not currently using cloud software. It won't be free but it will be at a discounted rate to our typical package.”

During Practice Excellence Live, HMRC’s Clare Sheehan and Digital Advisory Group chair Rebecca Benneyworth both spoke about the memorandum of understanding that is currently being thrashed out with BASDA that will cover future relations with the industry, cybersecurity and the free software issue.

AccountingWEB approached BASDA representatives for comment, but has not yet heard back. Perhaps they are too tied up in negotiations with HMRC.

Replies (52)

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By AndrewV12
24th Nov 2016 10:21

Extract above
'The tax and accounting software industry is showing some reluctance to buy into HMRC’s vision for free software to help the smallest businesses comply with quarterly reporting under the proposed Making Tax Digital regime'.

GET AWAY. just another example of HMRC pinkie perfect world.

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John Stokdyk, AccountingWEB head of insight
By John Stokdyk
24th Nov 2016 10:21

While we await the resolution of all the discussions, technical specifications and commercial decisions around the basic MTD tools, it's worth going back to another point that was raised in the consultation documents - support or incentives to help the smallest businesses make the transition to digital systems.

If the government did get a strong message from responses, it might provide a way out of the conundrum. Software providers could press ahead with new products, while the small businesses that would have to spend money to upgrade would get some compensation - and the end result would meet the government's somewhat optimistic undertaking that free software would be available to enable the digital regime to reach all sectors of business.

I'm looking forward to finding out how that idea pans out.

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By RobertD
24th Nov 2016 10:28

“We don’t think you can give a great experience without charging for it.”

I'm picturing Mickey Mouse at the gates of Disneyland

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Replying to RobertD:
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By MailPilot
24th Nov 2016 11:43

Personally, I have never trusted any "free" software with anything critical, such as accounts data, key reports, mathematical models, forecasts etc. If something were to go wrong with it and my work became mashed up, no buyer/seller relationship would exist and the software provider would have no obligation to help get me out of the mess.

In a less dramatic key, there's no guaranteeing that free software will be adequately updated as its hinterland develops and changes. Refer my points above.

No - I always feel safer with software I have researched and bought. Then the issue becomes one of avoiding being over-charged, which is down to me.

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Replying to MailPilot:
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By AndrewV12
24th Nov 2016 11:50

Believe it or not, the HMRC free software was okay, some of it has been withdrawn now though. It was slow, but okay.

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By RobertD
24th Nov 2016 10:31

John, you are looking forward to seeing how it pans out but many accountants aren't.

I suppose that's the difference between something that increases your readership and something that will be a god awful logistical nightmare

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By In a Daze
24th Nov 2016 10:36

Personally i think it should be down to HMRC to provide the free software. Otherwise the people who do have to pay will have to pay a premium for those that don't.

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Replying to In a Daze:
Tornado
By Tornado
24th Nov 2016 11:40

I think you are right and I made that point some time ag0 -

https://www.accountingweb.co.uk/any-answers/universal-software-goverment...

I believe if the Government are going as far as to prescribe the software to be used (by everyone in business) for MTD, then it is clearly their responsibility to provide the necessary software for everyone to use ... free.

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Replying to Tornado:
Morph
By kevinringer
25th Nov 2016 13:27

I agree that if HMRC mandate digital transaction recording HMRC should supply to tools - they can't expect taxpayers to have to pay to file. But, on the other hand, I don't want HMRC tools - look at Basic PAYE Tools: awful. HMRC have already forced companies to buy software to file. I guess this could be partly justified as being a price to pay for the advantages of incorporation. But a sole trader can't chose note to be a sole trader. As you've made the point previously Tornado, the problem is MTD itself.

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Replying to kevinringer:
Tornado
By Tornado
25th Nov 2016 14:05

The elephant in the room is the deference that HMRC extend to software developers, particularly the larger concerns that have massive influence over Government policy one way or another.

HMRC PAYE tools are an example of this in that there is only one way to run a payroll in accordance with HMRC requirements yet we have something like 300 payrolls to choose from, each with varying levels of efficiency. Logic dictates that all we need is one highly developed top quality free for all to use payroll program that HMRC update as and when required so that it is always compliant with the current regulations and therefore all users are compliant with the latest updates and regulations. We would all be on exactly the same level playing field and the Government would know that all data sent to it would integrate seamlessly with the MTD software.

I challenge anyone to say that this sort of logic is not the ultimate solution to ensuring that a Digitally administered Government runs efficiently.

At the moment HMRC do offer a payroll program for up to 10 employees and several of my clients use this successfully but it is blindingly obvious that the only reason it is limited to 10 employees is so that it does not take away business from the commercial concerns.

As Kevin says, the problem with MTD is MTD itself where there too many vested interests involved which are all pulling the feeble and impotent MTD team away from the logic that MUST be applied to any system that uses logic to function. i.e. any computerised system.

Is the Government really serious about MTD and Digital Transformation in general or does vested interest take priority? The answer to that is very clear to me.

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Replying to Tornado:
By Tim Vane
25th Nov 2016 14:54

Tornado wrote:

I challenge anyone to say that this sort of logic is not the ultimate solution to ensuring that a Digitally administered Government runs efficiently.

This sort of logic is not the ultimate solution to ensuring that a Digitally administered Government runs efficiently.

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Replying to Tim Vane:
Tornado
By Tornado
25th Nov 2016 15:07

Tim Vane wrote:

Tornado wrote:

I challenge anyone to say that this sort of logic is not the ultimate solution to ensuring that a Digitally administered Government runs efficiently.

This sort of logic is not the ultimate solution to ensuring that a Digitally administered Government runs efficiently.

because ... [insert alternative logic here]

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Replying to Tornado:
By Tim Vane
25th Nov 2016 15:12

because it is too easy to trip and drop the basket.

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Replying to Tim Vane:
Tornado
By Tornado
25th Nov 2016 15:37

A good answer but in the digital world there is no one to trip, nothing to trip over and baskets won't exist anyway.

There are only computers in the digital world and they will probably be running and maintaining themselves, deciding policies and controlling every aspect of our lives and NEVER going wrong.

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By crislar
24th Nov 2016 10:44

One thing to ask BASDA when you get in front of them. How they are protecting the client / advisor relationship etc?

Accounts preparation and reporting should not be forced into a silo of "cloud" "service provider" or third party infrastructures whether they are offered free at the point of delivery or not.

Dealing direct with Government needs to remain a core facility for all parties. It is also an important factor to ensure the relationship is clearly between the client and the advisor or agent acting in the client's interest and not creating conflicting obligations on advisors with the Government nor on client's Back Office Service Providers.

Advisors need to assure themselves that BOSPs they employ guarantee data and application portability (and test this periodically) so they can bring these in-house etc and that these providers report to the client only in the normal course of events.

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By david wilks
24th Nov 2016 10:47

The lunatics are running the asylum.

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By David Gordon FCCA
24th Nov 2016 10:54

Bit like the farmer asking the turkey to hold the axe whilst he the farmer, greases the roasting pan.
"Boots" the chemist makes money from people catching colds, but at least the company is honest about it, by agreeing that a cold is a nasty unwanted uncomfortable experience..

Software houses should be similarly honest, by stopping this PR nonsense about how all this MTD is a "Jolly good thing" for accountants to earn money. How may you be so cruel as to think that the software houses look on it as an opportunity for a profit windfall?
HMRC, & software houses, I tried hard to see your point of view, but the zoo-keeper said it was cruel and perverse to put my head that far up the elephant's [***].

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By DMGbus
24th Nov 2016 13:27

At an MTD consultation event that I attended recently here is some information provided by HMRC people (one of them from policy division):

1. HMRC has no intention of providing free software itself ... because...

2. HMRC are HOPING that software houses will offer free software ... but...

3. If free software was NOT available from software houses then HMRC would consider providing it

HMRC people were keen to ascertain the cost to agents of existing software that they used - only one agent gave a reply and that reply was £6 per client pa.

My conclusion from the above, is what I stated on this forum some months ago, the business model for software houses is that free to clients has to be paid for by charges to agents - higher charges than would be the case had there been no free offering to clients.

One other point was discussed - software support - question was should support be provided by HMRC rather than software houses as they were concerned to avoid this costly obligation, problem perceived however was that the user interface (probably different for each software) would be where users faced difficulties so in practical terms the support would have to be from software houses as it is unlikely that HMRC will have helpline staff trained to use each software product.

HMRC people were surprised to learn that ReceiptBank feeds into Xero could have incorrect analysis / VAT, HMRC people wondered if this was an OCR issue! Presumably ReceiptBank have kept it secret from HMRC that their codification of mobile phone photographed uploaded purchases invoices can be far from perfect.

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By david wilks
24th Nov 2016 11:40

The French farmers wouldn't stand for it. We all need to get tractors and block Whitehall.

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Replying to david wilks:
By jon_griffey
24th Nov 2016 15:07

Yes - accountants should block Whitehall with their BMW's and burn piles of working papers.

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By Roy Price
24th Nov 2016 11:58

There is no such thing as something for nothing. No doubt anything free will come with advertising or will extract marketing intelligence that it will sell on.

I use Google Maps app on my phone as a Sat Nav, it is sophisticated, kept up to date and works - above all it is Free.
So it is not beyond the realm that there will be free apps.
In my experience business people need assistance with their finances as they want to get on running their business.

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By jon_griffey
24th Nov 2016 12:02

Much of the existing crop of cloud accounting software sucks, to be quite frank. I have recently had to berate a well known provider who expect me to be a reseller of their product, that it is not fit for purpose because (i) it is completing VAT returns incorrectly and (ii) the TB doesn’t balance – and is out by a different amount each month.

If that is the current state of paid-for accounting software, then what on earth is free software going to be like? Even if it works as it should, it will have so little functionality that it is suitable for only the very, very simplest of businesses, perhaps a mobile hairdresser. Software providers cannot be expected to give away their full product.

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By janefg
24th Nov 2016 13:06

As Heinlein said "Anything free is worth what you pay for it"!

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Jason Piper
By Jason Piper
24th Nov 2016 13:09

Who's writing the free Welsh Language version?

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Replying to Jason Piper:
Tornado
By Tornado
24th Nov 2016 13:27

Yes indeed, a good point.

I worked out once that I deal with people of 20 different national backgrounds, many of whom do not use English as their main language.

You only have to look at any Government form to see that it is available in many different languages so it makes perfect sense to ensure that prescribed software is also available in many different languages, together with the support services.

Beth yw debyd a ble ydw i'n ei roi?

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Tornado
By Tornado
24th Nov 2016 13:29

The point about support is important of course. Free software will require support from somebody and with potentially hundreds of thousands of people who are currently Do-It-Yourself tax returners being forced to use accounting software, a great deal of support will be required by them to even get going with the software, let alone use it correctly.

Who will pay for and provide this support?

Perhaps the massive fines that HMRC will collect from those that cannot cope will provide the finance but I am absolutely sure that I will not be providing free support.

Even commercial software will require a lot of support and for those that have turnovers of just over £10,000 the amount of commercial software support required will be significant.

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By youngloch
24th Nov 2016 13:35

HMRC need to be ready for the "we told you!" scenarios:

I took on a new client this week - an electrical sub-contractor who is UNDER ENQUIRY!

It seems he put in 6 versions of his 2016 return and each time the expenses claim went up by a few thousand e.g. exactly by £2000, £4000 etc until he clearly got the refund he liked.

He claimed AIA, and even put in some private use...

I asked him what he claimed under AIA and he did not even know what that meant! When I suggested a van or tools his response was "oh that's what it's for" but he'd put £18000 in that box!

So I asked him where his backup was for the figures submitted..... answer, "I won't beat around the bush I just estimated it."

and that's what you get when you design a tax system that makes it easier not to use an accountant - more people filing themselves who are struggling financially and finding it hard to fight the temptation of artificially/fraudulently under-declaring

For God's sake Mr Hammond if you are worried about the tax-take from the self employed reducing then wake up to what MTD is going to cause.

Our job as accountants in my opinion is to act on behalf of clients, and HMRC, to ensure the right submissions are made......

So in my opinion free software = encouraging taxpayers to do it themselves = underdeclarations/errors = further drop in tax take leading to higher taxes (for those doing things properly) and a hell of a lot of wasted money on MTD

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By North East Accountant
24th Nov 2016 14:06

If I was a software company my response to HMRC;

"Get lost"

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By david wilks
24th Nov 2016 14:13

Harra. I hope someone is reporting back to you about this blog.
Again, my challenge to you still stands. Double dare you!

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By Joe Soap
24th Nov 2016 15:55

If I pay for software and it turns out to be a real dog and messes up my tax returns and I get a penalty I will claim from the software provider.
If I use HMRC software and it is a real dog and messes up my tax returns and I get a penalty I will tell HMRC where to stick it.
If I use some free stuff that I found on line and ..ditto... who do I sue?

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Replying to Joe Soap:
By Tim Vane
24th Nov 2016 16:08

Joe Soap wrote:
If I pay for software and it turns out to be a real dog and messes up my tax returns and I get a penalty I will claim from the software provider.

You could certainly try, but you wouldn't get anywhere. Read the small print.

Joe Soap wrote:
If I use HMRC software and it is a real dog and messes up my tax returns and I get a penalty I will tell HMRC where to stick it.

You could try, but Debt management would not listen and will not care.

Joe Soap wrote:
If I use some free stuff that I found on line and ..ditto... who do I sue?

Debt management would not care.

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Replying to Tim Vane:
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By Joe Soap
25th Nov 2016 17:13

Tim - I think you have totally missed the point.

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By Klhr
24th Nov 2016 16:42

When RTI came in for payroll, the same "Free Software to help everyone" reassurance was given. In reality all the free software is very basic, clunky and carries no support facility. There is no reason to expect anything different this time.

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By mydoghasfleas
25th Nov 2016 10:20

Time for a facetious Friday thought. HMRC Facebook page, lots of selfies, in fish lip pout holding receipts and then press share. I believe this is how HMRC thinks it will work.

Simples?

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By david wilks
25th Nov 2016 10:45

Also, I think, time for a reflective Friday. The anger that jumps out of the pages of responses to MTD is palpable.
We agents and accountants should take time out to really think if such anger is justified. Those pushing the boat out for MTD should also take time out to see if such anger is justified.
Having taken time out my opinion is that our anger IS perfectly justified.
To those pushing the boat when will you realise we ARE justified in our responses. Your platitudes can never placate us and neither can the glossy software ads.
You MUST listen to us and, more importantly HEAR what we are saying.
Give it up now. It's not broken so don't try and fix it.
Ok, you will lose face (more so with the software people. Perhaps you did a "Nissan" deal with them) but you will gain some respect from us.

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Replying to david wilks:
By Tim Vane
25th Nov 2016 11:43

david wilks wrote:
It's not broken so don't try and fix it.

Oh dear, you've just undermined your whole argument. It's very broken. Just because the fix is the wrong fix it doesn't mean that a fix isn't needed.

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Replying to Tim Vane:
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By david wilks
25th Nov 2016 12:48

Tim
I will be grateful if you would please let me know what makes you think the current way of dealing with HMRC is broken.
Clients bring us their stuff in various forms. We translate that into cogent information for HMRC once a year. We make sure our clients pay the correct amount of tax and deal with HMRC if they have any queries, leaving the clients to get on with their jobs.
Doesn't sound broken to me.

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Replying to david wilks:
By Tim Vane
25th Nov 2016 15:04

That's the way it's supposed to work. It's not the way it works. The vast majority of SA tax payers are not using agents and are not paying the correct tax. A good proportion of agents are frankly incompetent and don't know what they are doing. The agents that are competent and know what they are doing fight with HMRC, who are largely incompetent and don't know what they are doing. We try to make sure our clients pay the right amount of tax but we run the risk that the client goes to another agent where he will actually pay less tax, and get away with it. Even when a competent agent submits the correct tax figures HMRC are as likely as not going to amend the assessment using incorrect information gleaned from elsewhere in their monolithic data store.

The Self Assessment tax gap is (by even conversative estimates) 7 billion pounds. That, I contend, is a broken system.

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Replying to Tim Vane:
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By david wilks
25th Nov 2016 15:23

In which case HMRC should follow the Canadian method.

Whilst quarterly figures have been submitted to the tax authority over there since somewhere around 1990, Canadian tax payers are urged by their tax office to seek the services of an agent from a list thereof to make sure the 5th submission (for the 12 months) is correct.

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Replying to Tim Vane:
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By david wilks
25th Nov 2016 15:48

How is MTD going to fix that then?

Either incompetence will just go digital or the black market will flourish.

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By garyturner
25th Nov 2016 12:10

I love the quotation relating to free-to-use services like Facebook.

"If something's free, then it's likely you're the product that's being sold."

Free in the world of desktop software was simpler to achieve since there are no ongoing cloud hosting or servicing costs as the client installed and maintained the software, backups etc. on their own hardware.

Transfer the infrastructure element away from the client and someone has to pay an ongoing, even if only a nominal cost keep the service running. Even if the client doesn't use the software.

Unless there's sufficient monetisation elsewhere in the chain to subsidise totally free at the client side;

- Convincing the client to upgrade to a premium, paid for version but the received software industry wisdom is this doesn't ever happen.

- Subsidised by advertising other products and services to the client. Again, hit and miss and messes up the client experience.

- The client consents (or maybe doesn't) to their data being analysed and resold on to third parties who will pay for it, or pay for advertising to clients on the basis of their data, ostensibly one of the main ways Facebook derives its revenue.

...it's unlikely a software vendor can deliver the experience it aspires to when nobody is paying, at least without compromising somewhere on service or customer experience. Which is ultimately a commercial decision for the software vendor to take.

Gary Turner
Managing Director, Xero
@garyturner

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Replying to garyturner:
Tornado
By Tornado
25th Nov 2016 12:43

I did not know that HMRC had a Facebook page until mentioned here (I do not have any particular use for Facebook myself) but I am somewhat alarmed by the possibility that Facebook is harvesting unlimited information from this HMRC account and using it for commercial purposes. I assume that there is no access to secure HMRC data, but can that be assured?

I am reminded of this -

http://www.wired.co.uk/article/privacy-versus-facebook

- which may not reflect current policies of Facebook but who knows for sure?

I use free software regularly which is often as good as or better than commercial software, one example being GIMP which is a GNU Image Manipulation Program. The point with this and many other quality free programs is that it has been created and developed by very talented enthusiasts who have no commercial motive.

The Government have no commercial motive and are prescribing the software that we have to use, so in my mind they should develop the software they want us to use and let us use it for free.

If commercial concerns like Xero want to see a secure future, then they need to tell the Government that they should either develop suitable software and make it available to EVERYONE for free or, hold back on the mandatory aspects of MTD and the rate of introduction so that we as Accountants, Book-keepers and other Agents can take proper commercial decisions as to which software we are going to use and ultimately recommend to our clients.

The mandatory aspect of MTD stinks and is not acceptable to many, but commercial developers do have influence over the Government and can voice strong concerns about the speed of introduction and recommend a more reasonable period of time to say 2015 as the being the full implementation date.

I my view, this sort of honest intervention by software developers will score them more brownie points than dozens of them trying to convince us that their product is the best through dubious sales techniques.

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Replying to Tornado:
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By RobertD
25th Nov 2016 14:39

Arrgh 2015. Some half wit at HMRC might see that as a good idea.

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By RobertD
25th Nov 2016 14:49

Customer experience.

Nauseating.

I think that a few adverts on screen is the least of my farmers, hairdressers and builders problems.

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Replying to RobertD:
Tornado
By Tornado
25th Nov 2016 15:02

It might be necessary to explain to some of the MTD Team what a Farmer is.

Builders may also be a bit of a mystery to them but I am pretty sure that they will know what a Hairdresser is.

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By RobertD
25th Nov 2016 15:21

When this folly fails the axe will fall on Harra but the HMRC Hydra will grow another head who will continue to make ill thought plans listening to the sort of glossy propaganda spewed by the software companies and their like.

The real issue is that as a society the bureaucracy is stifling. Legions of rule makers and red tape producers justify their existence by making rules and red tape. All of this on the back of real businesses that produce things of value.

And the government wonder why productivity is lower than other countries.

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Stepurhan
By stepurhan
25th Nov 2016 16:03

@gary turner

A key part of the promotion of MTD by HMRC is that free software will be available. You have now clearly stated that you will not be supplying a free version of Xero.

As the software houses, including yourself, appear to have been in conversation with HMRC for some time on MTD, there is an obvious question. At what point did you make it clear to them that, as far as you were concerned, a free offering from you was never going to happen?

Please note I mean a definite statement that it won't happen. Simply not making a statement on it either way, when free software is such a key part of implementation, would not be enough.

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Replying to stepurhan:
By garyturner
25th Nov 2016 16:41

I personally explained to HMRC that Xero wouldn't be offering a free tool about a year ago, not least for the reasons I explained in my earlier comment.

I'm certain, however, that there will no doubt be free tools.

As I explained on our roadshows around the country over the last two weeks, we think that the basic building blocks for MTD are already largely present in our basic Xero offering today (a simple mobile client app, a low cost Ledger or Cashbook (with automated bank feeds) subscriptions [which are £24 or £60 per client per annum respectively], and our practice reporting tools) and Xero's growing connectivity with other Apps and practice suites, and we're clear that our primary customer is the accountant and their client, not HMRC - in fact I had a presentation slide these last two weeks that simply said "We work for you, not HMRC", and that therefore our focus will be to eliminate or mitigate as much of any increased burden that results from whatever MTD turns out to be post consultation review.

I should say that when we think about 'client', we're only talking about self employed business owners, sole traders and companies, not filers in regular employment who will also have to comply.

Gary Turner
Managing Director, Xero
@garyturner

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Replying to garyturner:
Stepurhan
By stepurhan
28th Nov 2016 12:33

garyturner wrote:

I personally explained to HMRC that Xero wouldn't be offering a free tool about a year ago, not least for the reasons I explained in my earlier comment.

So HMRC have known for at least a year that you won't be offering free software. Whilst I am assuming you are not in a position to know, it seems likely your competitors have done something similar.

In light of that, I am at a loss to understand why both you and HMRC are still saying

Quote:
I'm certain, however, that there will no doubt be free tools.

As you have said yourself, no commercial business can offer support for a product without the income to pay those costs. So why this certainty that somebody will be able to do it anyway?

My concern was that the software companies had strung HMRC along knowing they won't ever provide a free offering. From your statement, at least Xero hasn't done that, and I would hope other major players would have the same integrity. So why is MTD chuntering along when a key feature, free software to all so MTD doesn't cost businesses more, is dead in the water?

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By sosleepy
25th Nov 2016 16:32

"Turner explained that Xero’s philosophy is “not to do it for free” and added: “Our lowest price plan has to be worth something.”.

I really wish HMRC would tell him that free software is happening anyway because free software is the future.

I love how we're all backward for not supporting this and how amazing it is etc etc, then HMRC say something the $oftware people don't like and all of a sudden it's "woah hang on we don't like the sound of that..."

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